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Mechanical Fuel Pumps

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6 replies to this topic

#1
Kanka

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Has anyone any experience of running a mechanical fuel pump on a mainly road driven GTR ( maybe 6 track days, a couple of Euro tracks and the odd drag outing )?
Any issues and would you consider it a track only option?
With a rear mount cable driven pump my only concern is the reliability of the cable drive.
  • Mattson and ouija like this

#2
ouija

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I had been exploring this option as well in conjunction with my Magnus dry sump kit.  My research has led me to the following assumptions, some of which may be wrong, and I'd be more than happy for someone with more knowledge to chime in and correct me on any points.

  • T1 mechanical fuel pump is, in my opinion, the most logical and "correct" setup due to being gravity fed, but appears to be race only due to the location of the drive unit on the bellhousing and location of the fuel pump.  It is my understanding that custom downpipes need to be fabricated and that a fuel cell is required to use this kit, which means you have to cut up the trunk to some degree.  Additionally, the location of the gravity fed pump on the fuel cell prevents the mounting of any cat back.  It's also cable drive which is not street friendly as the cable needs to be lubricated frequently. 
  • Magnus mechanical fuel pump is mounted on the engine and run off the crank.  I have first hand experience with a different car configured in this manner and it's not ideal as occasionally it's difficult to prime and hold fuel pressure because the pump needs to be gravity fed and it's not going to be because it's in the opposite direction of the fuel supply and it's flowing against the force of acceleration of the car.   The nice thing is that it's belt driven so there's no cable to lube and there shouldn't really be a reason why you can't retain everything (cat back/power steering/AC/alternator/etc.).  I am not sure if it's possible to run the stock fuel tanks with this configuration.
  • Another option I've been considering, and seen some cars use successfully, is having the in tank electrical pumps feed a surge tank towards the front of the car, such as in the battery compartment or elsewhere in the engine bay, then gravity feed the mechanical fuel pump which will be driven off of the crank via belt.  From there, return fuel to the surge, and then return from the surge to the factory tanks.  This configuration presents its own complications and added complexities due to all the lines and fittings.

I'd also love to hear others opinions, experiences and/or corrections on this topic.


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#3
Kanka

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You are at the same point as myself. Thanks for the great post!

#4
franzcars

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We've run a mechanical on another platform, LS swapped 240z. We tried a cable drive below the tank, belt driven with a helper pump, and finally a surge tank. The surge tank at the top of the engine compartment has been the best result on it, no more hot start issues and it primes super fast. We feed the surge tank with a walbro 480, that's used to transfer fuel from the cell to the surge, as well as priming the rails. There's a check valve on the return from the lines to the rail, and a low pressure carb regulator on the return from the surge to the cell. This is the best solution we have found, at least for us


Edited by franzcars, 09 July 2018 - 11:44 AM.

  • 7racer and thehelix112 like this
2013 Premium Deep Blue Pearl with 285/35 PSS's front, 18"NT05R's rear, SIR USM's, HKS Upgraded Actuators, TiTek 90mm Downpipes, AAM Resonated Midpipe, GotBoost intakes, GotBoost SD kit, Visconti Flex Fuel, Bosch 2200's, Fore tripple pump with with twin 485's DIY hardwired, Ecutek Etune by Bill@SprayItRacing
Appearance: TSW Nurburing rear, Diode Dynamics Tail as Turn with quad backup lights, always on front DRLs, Diode Dynamics LED City, Trunk, Map and License Plate lights
 
530AWHP with a Cobb OTS stage 1 only
555AWHP with MP/tune from Linney
Best ET 10.52@128 with midpipe/tune/NT05R's
 
Gone but never forgotten, Memorial Day 2017

New GTR
2009 SS Jack's Built ETS 3582R. From Motown to The Lou, and we're proud

#5
Stuart@T1

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I had been exploring this option as well in conjunction with my Magnus dry sump kit.  My research has led me to the following assumptions, some of which may be wrong, and I'd be more than happy for someone with more knowledge to chime in and correct me on any points.

  • T1 mechanical fuel pump is, in my opinion, the most logical and "correct" setup due to being gravity fed, but appears to be race only due to the location of the drive unit on the bellhousing and location of the fuel pump.  It is my understanding that custom downpipes need to be fabricated and that a fuel cell is required to use this kit, which means you have to cut up the trunk to some degree.  Additionally, the location of the gravity fed pump on the fuel cell prevents the mounting of any cat back.  It's also cable drive which is not street friendly as the cable needs to be lubricated frequently. 
  • Magnus mechanical fuel pump is mounted on the engine and run off the crank.  I have first hand experience with a different car configured in this manner and it's not ideal as occasionally it's difficult to prime and hold fuel pressure because the pump needs to be gravity fed and it's not going to be because it's in the opposite direction of the fuel supply and it's flowing against the force of acceleration of the car.   The nice thing is that it's belt driven so there's no cable to lube and there shouldn't really be a reason why you can't retain everything (cat back/power steering/AC/alternator/etc.).  I am not sure if it's possible to run the stock fuel tanks with this configuration.
  • Another option I've been considering, and seen some cars use successfully, is having the in tank electrical pumps feed a surge tank towards the front of the car, such as in the battery compartment or elsewhere in the engine bay, then gravity feed the mechanical fuel pump which will be driven off of the crank via belt.  From there, return fuel to the surge, and then return from the surge to the factory tanks.  This configuration presents its own complications and added complexities due to all the lines and fittings.

I'd also love to hear others opinions, experiences and/or corrections on this topic.

Just want to address one thing in regards to our kit. We do offer a kit for full exhaust applications.  Working on the write-up and media currently.


  • Tim, 7racer and Mattson like this

t1sig%20new_zpsrcxzxhwf.jpg


#6
ouija

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Just want to address one thing in regards to our kit. We do offer a kit for full exhaust applications.  Working on the write-up and media currently.

Hi Stuart,

 

Looking forward to seeing this!  Can you comment on the streetability of this new kit (cable drive/fuel cell requirements), or will we need to wait for the full press release?  Thanks!



#7
Kanka

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Also looking forward to details/pricing.




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