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Broken wheel stud & upgrade to ARP studs

- - - - - wheel studs arp studs broken stud

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28 replies to this topic

#21
7racer

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yay for more track rats in here!


  • droptopp and thebeast like this

In7anity!!


#22
shawnhayes

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Lucky, 150 mph on two studs. This was the push it hard session and was going fastest of the day, therefore later, harder breaking. I heard what I thought was a small stone hit the undercarriage coming out of turn 15. In the straight the wheel felt as though it was out of balance. Very mild. Slowed down heading into turn 1. It took me 15 minutes in the pit to recognize the problem. I was looking everywhere, then stepped back, my heart stopped. Prior, I had continued heating problems with the front brakes for a couple of yrs, that is why I had the temperature strip on the caliper. Heat cycles may have weakened an already weak part. Prior to this I did not know it was a weak area of the car. Recommend all shops suggest to the owner to change studs if they know the car is being tracked.

Also, if the car does not feel right on the track, get off.

 

I hate to admit that lug problems are very very common for the GT-R.

 

ANYTHING you do seems to be at risk.  But, the fact they are stock lugs for the Altima should be a clue.

 

Honestly, I think descartesfool's approach is the "right" one.

 

Replacement ARP studs with non-stock pitch.  The finer pitch that Nissan has chosen puts more clamping force on the wheel, making the stud expansion and cooling apply more force to the nut.  It also makes the stud more prone to "galling" if you ever take it off hot.  Not that I'd know anything about that.

 

Shawn


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#23
shawnhayes

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97601038_4379441115406677_11901493963653


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#24
thehelix112

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Those ARP studs?



#25
shawnhayes

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Those ARP studs?

 

Yep, galled horribly.  It took HOURS to wrench that off.  But, I did it slow, didn't want to break anything.

 

If I had all this shit to do over again, what I'd do....

 

#1 - get a trans cooler in my first year of GT-R ownership (like several people on here recommended, duh)

#2 - Use the cheaper pentosin fluid for my transmission

#3 - Use Motul or Redline oil in my GT-R from the first oil change and keep using it (or get smart and find the renewable lubricants first and stick with them)

#4 - copy the Enkei track wheels that descartesfool found in the first year of GT-R ownership (they disappeared later)

#5 - got several Performance Friction brake rotor replacements for the CBA as soon as they were available (three or four sets) and replace them as I killed them

#6 - got Hawk DTC-70's all around as soon as they came out and stuck with them

#7 - copied the "dyson vacuum hose" brake cooling solution from 44 from NAGTROC shortly after it was invented and ignored everything else

#8 - put the DBA shocks and springs on my CBA much earlier than I eventually did

#9 - put the coarse thread ARP studs on the front and back of the GT-R with the first stud change I did

 

I had a lot of fun, and enjoyed all that I learned.  Some lessons were "harder" than others, and some were more expensive than others.  Not doing the above was somewhat of my "independence" showing through.  Not that any of the other things I did were not useful or better than the above.  The above would have been cheaper and easier over the years.  Cheap and easy is okay when it comes to cars - maybe not life, but cars sometimes.

 

Shawn


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#26
thehelix112

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Details on #7 pls. Do you mean 42's spatula system or something else?

#27
shawnhayes

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Details on #7 pls. Do you mean 42's spatula system or something else?

 

You had the name right, 42.

 

https://www.gtrlife....rotorscalipers/

 

It's a ducted system put together with dyson vacuum parts.  It's as effective as anything else I've seen so far.

 

Shawn


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#28
jhammergtr

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Good hindsight. Heat and Brakes have been a challenge. I am finding that brakes last a long time when I am not tracking ...
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#29
shawnhayes

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Good hindsight. Heat and Brakes have been a challenge. I am finding that brakes last a long time when I am not tracking ...

 

Carbon ceramics - FOREVER without tracking.

 

In fact, on my BMW i3, I'm not sure I'll EVER need to replace brakes due to regenerative braking.  Track teaches you so much about  brakes so fast.

 

Shawn


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